Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

The CROSSPUNCTURE ® Therapy can be used for local points of pain, trigger points, tense muscles, painful joints, headaches, painful scars and many more indications. CROSSPUNCTURE ® can also be used for an acupuncture-like treatment without the use of needles.

How does the human body function?

Very small electrical impulses control a large number of functions and information processing in the human body. Whether muscular, fascial or neural functions or acupuncture points, the body frequently uses measurable electrical circuits and resistance. The skin is an important organ here. The largest human organ, equipped with a multitude of receptors and complexly connected to the inner organs and the brain, is able to farther transmit information, pain and perceptive input. Whether for diagnostics (ECG) or treatment (electrostimulation devices), the medical field has already been taking advantage of how the skin functions and its connections for many years now. The same applies to acupuncture, where the exact location of the acupuncture points to be treated are found via their electrical charge.

Injuries, diseases, scars and tense muscles – all of these affect the body’s electrical conduction system and result in dysfunction and pain being transmitted to the brain.

The fundamental component of the CROSSPUNCTURE ® Therapy is CROSSTAPE ®. The water-resistant CROSSTAPE ®’s are free of medication and active ingredients. The tapes are applied directly over points of pain, muscular trigger points and acupuncture points. Depending on the stresses applied (such as showering, swimming, sport or work), they can adhere to the skin for a period up to several days.

How does CROSSTAPE ® work

KUMBRINK CROSSTAPE ® is made of dual mixed fibres and is attached to a specially coated backing paper. When pulled off the backing paper, the CROSSTAPE ®’s are charged up electrostatically so that they are suitable for CROSSPUNCTURE ® Therapy. This means that the CROSSTAPE ® has a surplus of electrical charge once pulled off the backing paper that cannot discharge by itself. Once the CROSSTAPE ® has been charged in this manner, it is applied to the skin to stimulate the areas of pain and acupuncture points where it slowly releases its electrical charge.

KUMBRINK-CROSSTAPE ® are available in the sizes M, L and XL. The size M is used most of the time. Size L, XL or several size M tapes can be used on larger areas of pain. When doing so, it is important to remember that CROSSTAPE ®’s are not elastic and are unable to follow the skin when it is stretched. It is therefore preferable to use several size M-CROSSTAPE ® on areas where the skin is subject to strong stretching. The larger tapes are suitable for parts of the body less subject to stretch, such as the outer surfaces of the thigh and shoulder or the shin, etc.

For more information please browse the new crosspuncture.com site.

K-TAPE_lymph 2

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

Hosting a K-Taping course is a great opportunity to educate your staff (and others) on the innovative techniques and products offered by the K-Taping Academy Canada (KTAC). It also provides tremendous value to your clinic and patients.

The KTAC offers three (3) courses: K-Taping Pro, K-Taping Sports and K‑Taping for Women’s Health. All three courses are provided by trained and authorized K‑Taping Instructors and each course is given over a period of two (2) days, usually during weekends.

 

Getting started is easy: you can fill out the registration form online or give us a call at 1‑800-561-0310 ext 1710.

 

Training Supplies and Education Material

Each participant will receive a free K-Taping Kit at the beginning of the course (as shown on the image). The kit includes a K-Taping Course Manual, 4 rolls of K-Tape, and other practical items.
The course supplies will be sent to the hosting clinic at least three (3) business days before the scheduled training date.
An access to the International Forum, in order to review techniques, cueing, new content and programming is also included in the Kit.

 

Registration and Payment

Once a training session is scheduled, participants will be able to register through the K‑Taping Academy Canada website. Hosting clinics can designate the training to be either public or private. If the clinic chooses to host a public training, we will display the details on our website and anyone interested will be able to register for the event. If the clinic chooses to host a private training, we will provide them with a private registration link for their selected participants to register.

The clinic may choose to pay in advance for the required minimum number of participants. If the clinic chooses this option, they will be required to submit payment in full at the time of the booking. The names of participants will also be required in advance for this option.

 

Minimum Attendance

We require a minimum of 12 participants for each training unless otherwise agreed upon during the scheduling process. If the hosting clinic fails to meet the minimum required, they will be responsible for paying for the difference between the number of participants on the day of the training and the minimum required.

The clinic will be offered one free registration for an individual of their choosing. We will require the individual’s name during the clinic registration process or at least five (5) business days before the scheduled training. We will then get in touch with the selected individual for the free registration.

 

Promotion

We can promote the event (if public) on our website, social media accounts and e-mail newsletters. The hosting clinic is responsible for promoting the event throughout their appropriate promotion channels, local and regional contacts, other clinics and associations.

 

Space Requirements

Space requirements will vary depending on the K-Taping course selected. However, for most courses we require at least one (1) treatment table for every two (2) participants.

 

Hosting Clinic Requirements

The hosting clinic will be asked to nominate one individual (usually the free registrant) to assist with set-up, registration, breakdown and any other possible requirements during the day. If this person is not the free registrant, please provide us with the individual’s name and contact information at least five (5) business days before the scheduled training. If possible, we also request that you provide a screen or wall for the PowerPoint presentation, a trash can, black garbage bags and writing utensils.

 

Training Length

Trainings are from 8am to 4pm for a total of eight (8) hours unless otherwise agreed upon during the clinic scheduling process and are usually scheduled on Saturdays or Sundays.

 

Cancellations

After both parties have mutually agreed on a training date, the hosting clinic is expected to make every effort to hold the training as scheduled. If the hosting clinic is unable to provide the stated facility due to exceptional or unforeseen circumstances, the hosting clinic will provide us with an alternative venue of equal size in the local area.

We reserve the right to cancel up to seven (7) days before the training date for extenuating circumstances or if the minimum participants’ requirement is not met. Should this occur, a full refund will be issued to all participants. All of our trainings are non-refundable unless approved by the Director of the KTAC. Any request for cancellation must be submitted to the Director six (6) weeks prior to the training date. A cancellation fee of up to 50% of the minimum participant cost may apply.

 

Discounts

We provide the hosting clinics with one free registration as well as group discounts. Group discounts will be granted to clinics ensuring a minimum of 12 participants or a clinic that chooses to pay in advance for the minimum amount of participants.

IMG_6702

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

This type of injury is very common in contact sports. An impact to the muscles can cause more damage than you might expect and should be treated with respect. The muscle is crushed against the bone. If not treated correctly or if treated too aggressively then Myositis Ossificans may occur.

In addition to the P.R.I.C.E. method to all three grades of contusion, first apply a Lymphatic K-Taping application to the site of the injury.The fibrosis tape is a special lymphatic correction technique that loosens up protein-rich deposits and improves lymph flow.

First, apply the base of the fan cut tape proximal on the fibrosis. Appy the strips of tape with maximal stretch over and away from the injury site. Finish the application with the two-finger wide end unstretched. Apply the second tape 90 degrees rotated compared to the first base of tape 1. For better adhesion and pain inhibition, rub the tape strips for 30 seconds.

 

Examples of Hematoma K-Taping techniques:

 

 

 

 

Taping of rib contusion – K-Taping Academy Sport Book

 

 

 

 

Taping of the elbow – K-Taping Academy Sport Book

 

 

 

 

Taping of the thigh – K-Taping Academy Sport Book

 

 

Save time and try the Lymph Cuts by K-Tape
.

 

 

 

Training

Those who would like to learn and use this valuable and effective therapy method should first complete the Academy training and not attempt to learn it on their own, as it is only in a supervised, practical training course that one can learn how to correctly apply the special techniques required when working with elastic K-Tape, and learn the specific body positioning needed when treating athletes or other patients.

 

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

On behalf of the ShopTalk Blog Canadian Physio Association.

 

 

Lois Pohlod, B.Sc.P.T., McGill University 1979

 

 

 

 

After 35 years in physiotherapy, Lois Pohlod shares some tips on how to work with elite athletes  

My greatest achievement is how I’ve managed to get the most out of my career as a physiotherapist by working with active Canadians.  It is very rare that a physiotherapist can make a living working only with a National Sport Organization.  High performance sport has been a fun addition to my life, but has not been my entire focus.

Another proud achievement has been working in private practice and helping people of all ages with a variety of sport and work backgrounds return to normal.

Rio’s 2016 Canadian Health Services Team was experienced, skilled, flexible, and a pleasure to work with.  Having the opportunity to work with athletes from a range of sports and such an amazing team was a career highlight. If you’re a student or young professional looking to work with elite athletes, here is some advice for making it happen.

My first piece of advice is to have fun.  Really listen to what your patients say when they describe their injury. The diagnosis will often come to you before you have finished the assessment.

If you have the chance, work in a multidisciplinary setting so that you can be part of a team working towards optimal health for your patients.  Learn from all the health care professionals you work with – their experience will help you become a great therapist.

New physiotherapists should also remember to take their time with courses.  There are so many post graduate courses available, including acupuncture, manual therapy, dry needling, and functional movement.  It is hard to decide where to start!

I suggest spending the early part of your career developing assessment and clinical reasoning skills. Take courses in a way that you can digest and practice your new skills. It is both financially and mentally difficult to pack all the courses into the first few years of your career.   I always tell people to enjoy the journey. You have 35+ years to fill your toolbox!

Physiotherapy has so many areas where you can specialize.  I am now an instructor with K-Taping International Academy and I have had the privilege of working with the Women’s Health Division to develop a K-Taping for Women’s/Pelvic Health course.  These physiotherapists have knowledge and skills that compliment those of the orthopedic therapist.

The discussions during the course are most interesting and provide lots of time to reflect on what approach to treatment is best.  CPA’s Divisions  offer a wide variety of specialties – it will take a career to gain all the knowledge that is available!

If working with elite athletes is your goal, join the SPC and take advantage of the mentorship program.  The Sport Physiotherapy Certificate, Diploma and Clinical Specialty Program graduate holders are willing to help those who are working through the system.

Gain experience in many different sports. Athletes who play contact sports (unfortunately) have a great deal of injuries, but this is a good field to gain experience.  Be willing to volunteer your time to gain experience as most sports do not have an adequate budget, especially at the local and provincial level.   Check with the provincial sport organizations to see if they have a trainer or therapist development program in place.

About Lois Pohlod, B.Sc.P.T., McGill University 1979

 

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

The CROSSPUNCTURE ® Therapy can be used for local points of pain, trigger points, tense muscles, painful joints, headaches, painful scars and many more indications. CROSSPUNCTURE ® can also be used for an acupuncture-like treatment without the use of needles.

How does the human body function?

Very small electrical impulses control a large number of functions and information processing in the human body. Whether muscular, fascial or neural functions or acupuncture points, the body frequently uses measurable electrical circuits and resistance. The skin is an important organ here. The largest human organ, equipped with a multitude of receptors and complexly connected to the inner organs and the brain, is able to farther transmit information, pain and perceptive input. Whether for diagnostics (ECG) or treatment (electrostimulation devices), the medical field has already been taking advantage of how the skin functions and its connections for many years now. The same applies to acupuncture, where the exact location of the acupuncture points to be treated are found via their electrical charge.

Injuries, diseases, scars and tense muscles – all of these affect the body’s electrical conduction system and result in dysfunction and pain being transmitted to the brain.

The fundamental component of the CROSSPUNCTURE ® Therapy is CROSSTAPE ®. The water-resistant CROSSTAPE ®’s are free of medication and active ingredients. The tapes are applied directly over points of pain, muscular trigger points and acupuncture points. Depending on the stresses applied (such as showering, swimming, sport or work), they can adhere to the skin for a period up to several days.

How does CROSSTAPE ® work

KUMBRINK CROSSTAPE ® is made of dual mixed fibres and is attached to a specially coated backing paper. When pulled off the backing paper, the CROSSTAPE ®’s are charged up electrostatically so that they are suitable for CROSSPUNCTURE ® Therapy. This means that the CROSSTAPE ® has a surplus of electrical charge once pulled off the backing paper that cannot discharge by itself. Once the CROSSTAPE ® has been charged in this manner, it is applied to the skin to stimulate the areas of pain and acupuncture points where it slowly releases its electrical charge.

KUMBRINK-CROSSTAPE ® are available in the sizes M, L and XL. The size M is used most of the time. Size L, XL or several size M tapes can be used on larger areas of pain. When doing so, it is important to remember that CROSSTAPE ®’s are not elastic and are unable to follow the skin when it is stretched. It is therefore preferable to use several size M-CROSSTAPE ® on areas where the skin is subject to strong stretching. The larger tapes are suitable for parts of the body less subject to stretch, such as the outer surfaces of the thigh and shoulder or the shin, etc.

For more information please browse the new crosspuncture.com site.

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

 

Lois Pohlod, Physiotherapist, Diploma Sport Physiotherapy Canada, K-Taping Instructor-Chief Therapist Canada, 2016 Olympic Games, Rio de Janerio

 

Congratulations Lois! The K-Taping Academy Canada is very proud that Lois was named Chief Therapist Canada for the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. Lois was also presented with the Lifetime Member Award at the Canadian Physiotherapy Association Congress 2016. In addition to Sport Physiotherapy Canada, Lois uses her training in acupuncture and manual therapy along with K-Taping techniques in the treatment of all active Canadians.

Good luck to Lois and Team Canada in #Rio2016.

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

 

K-Taping can support an extraordinarily wide range of therapies and represents an effective tool for every physiotherapist who knows the method. Practitioners do not need to employ medicines or other pharmaceutical agents: simply applying the correct technique in conjunction with the appropriate K-Tape products produces optimal results. For example, here are 5 neurological applications created by Birgit Kumbrink, physiotherapist and founder of the K-Taping method:

 

Nervus Trigeminus

  • Nervus Trigeminus. The aim of this muscle technique is to relieve pain on all three branches. In most cases, the middle branch is affected. In contrast, to other nerve applications, this application is applied to the face without tension. The tape is divided into three strips. The base is attached in the front of the outer ear. Anchor the base with skin displacement and affix the individual tape strips with no tension, across the forehead, upper jaw, and lower jaw. The tape should cross the site of pain.

 Facial Paresis

  • Facial Paresis. This fascia correction technique lifts the affected corner of the mouth. As a result, drooling is reduced. The strip of tape is in the form of a box and divided into three parts. The base is fixed close to the corner of the mouth and using facial technique with 50% tension, apply the tape with rhythmic extension in the direction of the cheekbone. Affix the end of the tape without tension.

Extension of the Finger 

  • Extension of the Finger. This fascia technique is used to improve extension of the finger if there is a deficiency that is related to a neurological condition. The I strip tape  is attached below the fingernail. The finger is placed in the correct position manually. Using the fascia technique, tape is affixed proximally across the hand with 80% tension. 

Rotation of the Upper Arm

  • Rotation of the Upper Arm. This fascia technique is used to facilitate external rotation of the upper arm. The I strip is anchored above the condylus medialis humeri. Place the arm in the correct position manually, and use the fascia technique to affix the tape with 80% tension, moving rhythmically in a spiral around the arm and finish below the acromion. Attach the remainder of the tape to the scapula, unstretched. 

Colonic Support

  • Colonic Support. A fascia technique that follows the course of the large intestine to improve colonic function due a neurological disorder or following surgery. Divide an I-tape strip into two parts. The base is anchored at the level of the cecum. Use the fascia technique to affix the tape with 50% tension, moving rhythmically and following the course of the colon. Attached the tape end unstretched.

 

 

Courtesy of “Kumbrink K-Taping Second Edition, An Illustrated Guide

 

Those who would like to learn and use this valuable and effective therapy method in their clinic should first complete the academy training and not attempt to learn it on their own, as it is only in supervised, practical training that one can learn how to correctly apply the special techniques required when working with elastic K-Tape. For more information on the K-Taping course schedule in Canada, please refer to K-Taping Canada.

 

K-TAPE_hema6

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

This type of injury is very common in contact sports. An impact to the muscles can cause more damage than you might expect and should be treated with respect. The muscle is crushed against the bone. If not treated correctly or if treated too aggressively then Myositis Ossificans may occur. In addition to the R.I.C.E. method to all three grades of contusion, first apply a lymphatic K-Taping application to the site of the injury.The fibrosis tape is a special lymphatic correction technique that loosens up protein-rich deposits and improves lymph flow. First, apply the base of the Lymph Pre-Cuts proximal on the fibrosis. Appy the strips of tape with maximal stretch over and away from the injury site. Finish the application with the two-finger wide end unstretched. Apply the second tape 90 degrees rotated compared to the first base of tape 1. For better adhesion and pain inhibition, rub the tape strips for 30 seconds. 

Those who would like to learn the K-Taping method in their work should first complete the K-Taping Academy training.

 

 

 

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

 

Written by Andrea Mendoza BSc MPT, K-Taping Therapist, founder and owner of The ScoliClinic in Vancouver, BC

 

I’ve heard established physiotherapist colleagues say “volunteering overseas sounds great, but I don’t think it’s for me”. New physiotherapists have told me “I’d like to volunteer overseas someday, but I want to focus on my career in Canada first”.

Working full-time in global health certainly isn’t for everyone, but I truly believe that one single trip abroad can profoundly benefit one’s physiotherapy career in Canada.

In the fall of 2015 I was craving an adventure, so paused my Canadian physiotherapy career to return to the “small” town (population: 60,000) of Koppal in Southern India to volunteer for 5-months with Samuha Samarthya, an NGO dedicated to working with people with disabilities. I had volunteered here twice before in a clinical role, but this trip’s focus was on improving Samarthya’s sustainability strategies and facilitating the growth of their programs. I was anxious and excited to coordinate this project and try my hand at the management side of physiotherapy.

Five days prior to take off, a non-conventional twist of fate resulted in the decision to open my own clinic upon returning to Canada. I was to plan most of the start-up while I was in Koppal. Wait… What?!

I was concerned about managing these two equally big projects but decided to try it out (why not?), as I remembered a quote from Robin Sharma encouraging that you “push yourself to the edge of your limits; that’s how they expand”. I had an inkling that I would probably learn a lesson or two while jumping into the massive ocean of an experience but didn’t realize how many life lessons, new skills, failures, and Aha! Moments that would hit me like an intense flurry of spicy curry. These seemingly different projects – volunteering to improve sustainability of a rural Indian NGO, and opening a private pediatric scoliosis clinic in Canada – were more interconnected than I could have imagined.

In short, here are the top 5 non-physiotherapy skills that I learned over the past 6 months abroad that will unquestionably contribute to my physiotherapy career in Canada:

1) When choosing your team, trust your gut:  After I put out a call for volunteers on facebook, I was overwhelmed by the interest. As the NGO was a very close-knit team, we had to ensure that each volunteer would be adaptable and fit the culture of Samuha well. I spoke to many people on the phone and Skype, and I learned that despite their skill sets on paper, I needed to trust that initial gut feeling.  The resulting 15 volunteers absolutely blew everyone away with their dedication and motivation to help. This strengthened my confidence in my intuition, and I will feel more assured in choosing my team in the future. Sometimes we don’t always have full control over our professional team as Canadian physios, but we do get to choose our personal team – accountants, financial advisors, professional connections, and friends – gut instinct rules and will always lead to the best results.

 Julie Alexander (Pediatric PT), Andrea, and Jen Tam (Neuro PT)

 

2) I downloaded Michael Gerber’s E-Myth Revisited onto my trusty Kindle in preparation for opening my clinic, and learned that a MUST of running an organization is to have the organization run independent of any key individual decision-makers to avoid information bottlenecks. In order to this, one must work ON the business, rather than IN it. Focus must be placed on clarifying steps in any process and minimizing the need for human subjective decision-making. I noted that often at Samarthya, these sorts of things weren’t clear, therefore it seemed like some people spent the better parts of their day waiting for other staff to make decisions or clarifying who’s responsibility it was to complete a task. Because we observed this, most of the volunteers efforts went into establishing exactly how to go about ordering wheelchairs, referring a patient to another program, or planning a 2-month inpatient stay at the Spinal Cord Injury Center. I learned the importance of documenting every process in any new business.  Here in Canada, we run very ‘busy’ lives so learning to systematize and automate as many processes will be crucial to freeing up our time to do more of the things we love.

Malena from the BCIT Prosthetics & Orthotics Team discussing flow in the workshop to maximize efficiency

3) Samarthya had four clinical sites, two of which were 200kms from the others.  I walked the line (sometimes falling off either side) of learning how to provide support (often from a distance) to staff and volunteers without micromanaging according to each person’s level of need. As volunteers flowed through for 4-6 weeks at a time, I became the 5-month constant, clarifying logistics of travel, accommodation, work tasks, and cultural integration for the volunteers, while continuing planning with staff for tightening up program operations. I was challenged with electricity interruptions, spotty internet,  language barrier, and opposing cultural views on the concept of time. I learned that some staff or volunteers needed more guidance, while others thrived on autonomy and independence. At some point in our Canadian careers, we will be guiding students, colleagues, or other staff and will be responsible for facilitating their success so it’s important to be aware of each person’s individual needs.

I took countless train, bus, jeep, motorcycle, and auto rickshaw rides to meet the teams in various locations.

4) It’s okay to fail, but learn to do it fast! Prior to India, I was a perfectionist, agonizing over small details until it was just right before launching anything. India changed all that. There it was common that things didn’t play out as planned. It was almost impossible to align everything perfectly, and even if things did align, the situation often flipped so that those initial decisions became irrelevant. I learned that the trick is to quickly recognize when something isn’t working, accept it, and change the approach to optimize it.

At the Spinal Cord Injury Centre, clients were passive in their treatment, waiting until the therapist came around every 10 minutes to tell them what to do. We tried various approaches to empower the clients: first we tried written exercise schedules (but learned that some of the patients were illiterate), then visual boards with exercise images (but they found it challenging to wheel over to see the boards), then finally patients starting taking photos of the exercise images on their mobiles to have them handy and to access them when they went home. Starting a clinic has presented equal trials and failures, but because of my experience in India, I am learning to adapt quickly. Whether it’s trying a new manual therapy technique with a patient or rolling out a new program at your workplace here in Canada, the most important thing is to try it and analyze it, and not get hung up on small failures along the way.

The visual exercise boards that patients could take photos of, created by volunteer PT Sarah Monsees.

5) Be real. Professionalism is important on so many levels, but sometimes breaking down that barrier and connecting to fellow staff and patients is very important. In Koppal, I attended a wedding, a baby-naming ceremony, and was indulged in savoury, spicy food at staff’s houses. We established great friendships, and I found that my work-related suggestions were much more well-received due to the trust that had formed. Abroad or locally, it’s important to be yourself, and care for others on a personal level.

Channappa (center in light green shirt) is one of the new therapists at the Spinal Cord Rehab Centre. We were lucky to celebrate his wedding day with him.

 

Physio student Mary-Anne Levson, neuro PT Juliet Grundmanis, and I in traditional saris for the wedding

All of these lessons – trusting my intuition, working equally on my business as I do on my technical skills, providing the appropriate support to co-workers, failing fast, and being real – will undoubtedly stay with me throughout my career, particularly as I launch my new clinic. As much as I intended to make change at Samarthya, my time there in fact changed me tremendously – I have grown in countless ways personally and professionally from this volunteer trip abroad.

 

Andrea Mendoza BSc PT MPT, K-Taping Therapist

Andrea is a full-time paediatric physiotherapist at Kids Physio Group in Vancouver. She completed the Masters of Physical Therapy program at the University of British Columbia. She also received her Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology from the University of Northern BC in Prince George. Andrea is devoted to helping people achieve their highest quality of movement. Over the past three years, she has developed a passion for working with kids with sports injuries, orthopaedic conditions such as scoliosis, and post-concussion syndrome. Recently, she expanded her field and now collaborates with active adults and their personal trainers on movement and motor pattern re-training to optimize the client’s exercise plans. International health is also an interest of hers – she has done two volunteer trips to Southern India to work with children with special needs. She is always seeking new opportunities to improve her skills – Andrea has completed Levels 1 and 2 of the Advanced Orthopedic Manual and Manipulative Therapy Diploma. She is also a certified K-Taping® Therapist, and has completed NeuroKinetic Therapy™ level 1 as well as the Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) course. In her free time, she loves being active in any way possible, whether that’s training for a running race, doing yoga, hiking, swimming, or trying new exercises at the gym. Andrea’s also sure to make time for travelling, playing the piano, and cooking for her friends!

 

 

womens health top

Posted by & filed under Special Courses.

Dear K-Taping Professional

K-Taping Academy Canada is pleased to offer the Women’s Health K-Taping Course in Toronto May 7-8, 2016.  This course has been widely attended in Europe for many years and was successfully introduced in Montreal and Calgary earlier this year.

This course is open to Physiotherapists with a special interest in Women’s Health.  Completion of a previous K-Taping Pro or Sport course is not mandatory.  A description of the course is included in this email.  Please pass this information along to your colleagues.  Information and registration can be found at www.k-taping.ca

Sincerely,

Lois Pohlod, P.T.
K-Taping Academy International Instructor, Canada

 

 

K-Taping® for Women’s Health Course Overview

K-Taping® for Women’s Health is a two-day, practical application course in women’s health K-Taping techniques. The course begins with an overview of the theory and purpose of the K-Taping practical applications and the history of the K-Taping Academy.

Who should attend? : Physiotherapists with a special interest in Women’s Health and Pelvic Health.

Course Details:

• Practical taping includes a demonstration and practice of each of the techniques used in the K-Taping method.  Muscle techniques include ways to relax or increase stimulation of muscles. Ligament stability applications are used for joint and tendon support as well as the relief of trigger point pain.  The functional correction and fascial correction techniques can be used in the treatment of Women’s Health dysfunctions such as pelvic instability.  Lymphatic drainage techniques have been shown to provide relief of swelling during pregnancy, post operatively and in lymphedema care.

• Specific Taping Techniques included in this course are:

  • Lumbar and neck muscle relaxation
  • Sacral iliac joint support
  • Carpal tunnel symptom relief for cases caused by both mechanical problems and pregnancy.
  • Abdominal support techniques during pregnancy.
  • Postural correction application.
  • Treatment of edema during pregnancy, post surgical and lymphedema cases.
  • Tape applications for instability of the pubic symphysis.
  • Introduction and uses of Cross Tape.
  • Postnatal recovery of the uterus and abdominal pain/cramping.
  • Colon K-Taping to help ease constipation post surgically and with travel.
  • Discussion and demonstration on techniques for
    • Breast engorgement
    • Mastitis
  • Scar taping techniques for post cesarean section and other post surgery cases.
  • Suggestions for taping of a diastasis recti
  • Transverse abdominus stimulation and core stability exercises
  • Taping for relief of dysmenorrhea.
  • Taping to improve bladder control.
  • Taping to assist patients with pelvic organ prolapse.
  • Learn more about this new course!

 

In partnership with: